Rocket Man Elton John Keyboard and Vocals

677
323 views
Published on December 16, 2018 by S SS

Kris Grauel
Published on Jan 3, 2018
She packed my bags last night pre-flight
Zero hour nine AM
And I’m gonna be high as a kite by then
I miss the earth so much I miss my wife
It’s lonely out in space
On such a timeless flight

And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone

And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone

Mars ain’t the kind of place to raise your kids
In fact it’s cold as hell
And there’s no one there to raise them if you did
And all this science I don’t understand
It’s just my job five days a week
A rocket man, a rocket man

And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone

And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone

And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time

“Rocket Man” (officially titled “Rocket Man (I Think It’s Going to Be a Long, Long Time)”) is a song composed by Elton John and Bernie Taupin and originally performed by John. The song first appeared on John’s 1972 album Honky Château and became a hit single, rising to No. 2 in the UK and No. 6 in the US. On 21 October 2016, the song was certified Silver by the British Phonographic Industry for sales of 200,000 digital downloads.

Rolling Stone lists it as No. 245 of its 500 greatest songs of all time.

This article contains a list of miscellaneous information. Please relocate any relevant information into other sections or articles. (June 2017)
CKBE-FM David Tyler 1991.
At the 5th Saturn Awards Ceremony, which aired as the Science Fiction Film Awards in January 1978, Taupin introduced William Shatner’s spoken word[27] interpretation of the song. It used chroma key video techniques to simultaneously portray three different images of Shatner, representing the different facets of the Rocket Man’s character. The performance built up a cult following, and was parodied on the U.S. animated series Animaniacs, Family Guy, Freakazoid!, Futurama, The Simpsons, the Canadian CGI series ReBoot, and in the video for “Where It’s At” by Beck. On a 1992 episode of Late Night with David Letterman, Chris Elliott parodied Shatner’s performance, complete with chroma key effects. Shatner re-recorded the song for his 2011 album, Seeking Major Tom. In his book What Were They Thinking? The 100 Dumbest Events in Television History, author David Hofstede ranked Shatner’s performance at #17 on the list.[28]
Hank Marvin did an instrumental of the song on his 1993 album Heartbeat.
The John Tesh Project featuring Brandon Fields on saxophone, covered the song from their 1997 album “Sax All Night.”[29]
Punk rock cover band Me First and the Gimme Gimmes performed the song on their 1997 debut album, Have a Ball, and it is a staple of their live shows.
Alvin and the Chipmunks covered the song for their 1998 album The A-Files: Alien Songs.
The Nixons performed the song regularly at concerts and included a studio-recorded version on their 1999 EP Scrapbook.
Post hardcore act Boysetsfire covered the track for their 2001 EP, Suckerpunch Training. It was also listed on the track listing to their rarities album, Before the Eulogy but did not actually appear on the recording.
On the radio show This American Life episode “Classifieds” (2002), a group of amateur musicians who had been found through their classified ads were brought together for one day to rehearse and record “Rocket Man” in a studio. The free MP3 is available online.[30]
Steven Drozd of The Flaming Lips and Maynard James Keenan of Puscifer, Tool (band) and A Perfect Circle released a cover of the track “Rocket Man” for the soundtrack of the 2009 documentary “The Heart is a Drum Machine.” The song was released for digital download from the iTunes Store on 15 October 2010. The track can also be heard on Puscifer’s website with the title “Rocket Mantastic.”[31]
Daphne Rubin-Vega released a Dance version in 2003 which reached the Club play charts[32]
A cover version by My Morning Jacket appeared on their album Early Recordings: Chapter 1: The Sandworm Cometh (2004). This version was featured in the pilot episode of the Showtime original series Californication

To embed this video in another website, use the following embed code: <video width="100%" controls on><source src="" type="video/mp4"></video> Category Tag

Add your comment